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Cluster Reviews #3 A Silva Screen Special

Silva Screen very kindly and continuously send me copies of their releases for review; and all too often I don’t review them. Now, whilst I’m not here to do record labels any favours or to promote their albums, I do feel a bit bad that I’m so far behind with Silva’s releases. With this episode of Cluster Reviews I want to see if we can restore some balance in the universe. I’ll be covering two Doctor Who releases, Shetland, Edie, an Essential Games Music Collection and no less than 100 Greatest Science Fiction Themes!

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The Classics: James Horner

Sony has released James Horner: The Classics, a compilation of famous themes by Horner performed by various and varying artists – with mixed results, to be honest. The release comes just days before Horner’s would-be 65th birthday and as such makes for a nice remembrance compilation. Whilst I have a few issues with this album, I cannot fault the performances and the passion from everyone involved. It had me scratching my head a few times, but on the whole it’s a compelling album. Read more…

Cluster Reviews #02

In this digitally printed episode of Cluster Reviews I’d like to focus on a few scores that one might describe as ‘beautiful’. The spotlight is on Mark McKenzie’s Max & Me, Roque Banos’ The Miracle Season, Laurent Eyquem’s Nostalgia and a re-release of the compilation The Complete London Sessions by Georges Delerue. So sit back, relax, close your eyes and … open your eyes to read the reviews.
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Cluster Reviews #01

I’ve been listening to more soundtracks than I’ve been able to review. So here is an attempt to catch up with at least a few of them. You’ll see more of these so-called Cluster Reviews over the next few weeks, as I’ve got soundtracks coming out of my ears with very little time to write extensive reviews for each and everyone of them. So, included in this Cluster are scores like The Titan, Life of the Party, The Sinner and Pickpockets. Read more…

Mary Shelley (Amelia Warner)

I loved Frankenstein as a kid; the book, I mean. It’s a fascinating read. Imaginative, compelling, disturbing, yet full of sympathy. Equally fascinating it its author’s live. Mary Shelley’s experienced her own fair share of drama. She suffered several miscarriages, her husband drowned during a sailing trip, and Mary herself spent the last decade of her life ill, likely from a brain tumour. Not mentioning the constant debt and, for some reason, not fully fitting into society. Now, there have been plenty of films based on Shelley’s more famous novel, so it’s nice to see that there’s a film about the author itself, though it’s sad to see the film is being poorly received.

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